Category Archives: Writing

Phil 1.17.19

7:00 – 3:30 ASRC PhD, NASA

  • Lyrn.AI – Deep Learning Explained
  • Re-learning how to code in PHP again, which is easier if you’ve been doing a lot of C++/Java and not so much if you’ve been doing Python. Anyway, I wrote a small class:
    class DbIO2 {
        protected $connection = NULL;
    
        function connect($db_hostname, $db_username, $db_password, $db_database){
            $toReturn = array();
            $this->connection = new mysqli($db_hostname, $db_username, $db_password, $db_database);
            if($this->connection->connect_error){
                $toReturn['connect_successful'] = false;
                $toReturn['connect_error'] = $this->connection->error;
            } else {
                $toReturn['connect_successful'] = true;
            }
            return $toReturn;
        }
    
    
        function runQuery($query) {
            $toReturn = array();
            if($query == null){
                $toReturn['query_error'] = "query is empty";
                return $toReturn;
            }
            $result = $this->connection->query($query);
    
            if (!$result) {
                $toReturn['database_access'] = $this->connection->error;
                return $toReturn;
            }
    
            $numRows = $result->num_rows;
    
            for ($j = 0 ; $j < $numRows ; ++$j)         {             $result->data_seek($j);
                $row = $result->fetch_assoc();
                $toReturn[$j] = $row;
            }
            return $toReturn;
        }
    }
  • And exercised it
    require_once '../../phpFiles/ro_login.php';
    require_once '../libs/io2.php';
    
    $dbio = new DbIO2();
    
    $result = $dbio->connect($db_hostname, $db_username, $db_password, $db_database);
    
    printf ("%s\n",json_encode($result));
    
    $result = $dbio->runQuery("select * from post_view");
    
    foreach ($result as $row)
        printf ("%s\n", json_encode($row));
  • Which gave me some results
    {"connect_successful":true}
    {"post_id":"4","post_time":"2018-11-27 16:00:27","topic_id":"4","topic_title":"SUBJECT: 3 Room Linear Dungeon Test 1","forum_id":"14","forum_name":"DB Test","username":"dungeon_master1","poster_ip":"71.244.249.217","post_subject":"SUBJECT: 3 Room Linear Dungeon Test 1","post_text":"POST: dungeon_master1 says that you are about to take on a 3-room linear dungeon."}
    {"post_id":"5","post_time":"2018-11-27 16:09:12","topic_id":"4","topic_title":"SUBJECT: 3 Room Linear Dungeon Test 1","forum_id":"14","forum_name":"DB Test","username":"dungeon_master1","poster_ip":"71.244.249.217","post_subject":"SUBJECT: dungeon_master1's introduction to room_0","post_text":"POST: dungeon_master1 says, The party now finds itself in room_0. There is a troll here."}
    (repeat for another 200+ lines)
  • So I’m well on my way to being able to show the stories (both from the phpbb and slack) on the Antibubbles “stories” page

4:00 – 5:00 Meeting with Don

Phil 1.10.19

7:00 – 4:00 ASRC

  • The fragility of decentralised trustless socio-technical systems
    • The blockchain technology promises to transform finance, money and even governments. However, analyses of blockchain applicability and robustness typically focus on isolated systems whose actors contribute mainly by running the consensus algorithm. Here, we highlight the importance of considering trustless platforms within the broader ecosystem that includes social and communication networks. As an example, we analyse the flash-crash observed on 21st June 2017 in the Ethereum platform and show that a major phenomenon of social coordination led to a catastrophic cascade of events across several interconnected systems. We propose the concept of “emergent centralisation” to describe situations where a single system becomes critically important for the functioning of the whole ecosystem, and argue that such situations are likely to become more and more frequent in interconnected socio-technical systems. We anticipate that the systemic approach we propose will have implications for future assessments of trustless systems and call for the attention of policy-makers on the fragility of our interconnected and rapidly changing world.
  • Realized this morning that the weight matrix is a connectivity matrix between the neurons. That means that there are some very interesting things that we could do with partially connected layers. Sending signals just to adjacent downstream nodes in 2D – nD
  • More DNN post. Need to incorporate neuron graphs with the weight graphs, and update the sections of code about graphing. Done! And yet, somehow I’m still tweaking…
  • Working on the NoI. It’s a grind… Done? Sent off to John D.
  • Back to Docker
    • docker build -t friendlyhello . # Create image using this directory’s Dockerfile
    • docker run -p 4000:80 friendlyhello # Run “friendlyname” mapping port 4000 to 80
    • docker run -d -p 4000:80 friendlyhello # Same thing, but in detached mode
    • docker container ls # List all running containers docker container ls -a # List all containers, even those not running
    • docker container stop <hash> # Gracefully stop the specified container
    • docker container kill <hash> # Force shutdown of the specified container
    • docker container rm <hash> # Remove specified container from this machine
    • docker container rm $(docker container ls -a -q) # Remove all containers
    • docker image ls -a # List all images on this machine
    • docker image rm <image id> # Remove specified image from this machine
    • docker image rm $(docker image ls -a -q) # Remove all images from this machine
    • docker login # Log in this CLI session using your Docker credentials
    • docker tag <image> username/repository:tag # Tag <image> for upload to registry
    • docker push username/repository:tag # Upload tagged image to registry
    • docker run username/repository:tag # Run image from a registry
  • Ok, let’s see how to integrate with IntelliJ – Nope, reworking the data structures for better queries (and best practices as well). Sigh.

Phil 1.9.18

ASRC NASA(?) 7:00 – 6:30

  • Selective Exposure to Misinformation: Evidence from the consumption of fake news during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign
    • Though some warnings about online “echo chambers” have been hyperbolic, tendencies toward selective exposure to politically congenial content are likely to extend to misinformation and to be exacerbated by social media platforms. We test this prediction using data on the factually dubious articles known as “fake news.” Using unique data combining survey responses with individual-level web trac histories, we estimate that approximately 1 in 4 Americans visited a fake news website from October 7-November 14, 2016. Trump supporters visited the most fake news websites, which were overwhelmingly pro-Trump. However, fake news consumption was heavily concentrated among a small group — almost 6 in 10 visits to fake news websites came from the 10% of people with the most conservative online information diets. We also find that Facebook was a key vector of exposure to fake news and that fact-checks of fake news almost never reached its consumers.
  • Need to write justifications for Don – Done
  • More DNN from scratch
    • Added plotting of neurons converging to values. Now I need to change the writeup
  • Aaron’s sick. Not sure what the task for today should be. Antibubbles?
  • Downloading and installing Docker
    • Has to run as admin
    • Got Hello world running after getting this error:
      • C:\Windows\System32>docker run hello-world
      • docker: error during connect: Post http://%2F%2F.%2Fpipe%2Fdocker_engine/v1.39/containers/create: open //./pipe/docker_engine: The system cannot find the file specified. In the default daemon configuration on Windows, the docker client must be run elevated to connect. This error may also indicate that the docker daemon is not running.
      • See ‘docker run –help’.
    • You have to run the “Docker” app
    • Created a “Hello World” in python and containerized it. It runs!
    • Had to set up virtualization on the laptop
  • Connected to the ASRC gitlab and set up the IDE to use it
  • Write up a 250 word Notice of Intent
    • Notice of Intent (NOI) to Propose Material in a NOI is confidential and will be used for NASA planning purposes only, unless otherwise stated in the FA. An NOI is submitted by logging into NSPIRES at http://nspires.nasaprs.com. Space is provided for the applicant to provide, at a minimum, the following information, although additional special requests may also be indicated:
      • A Short Title of the anticipated proposal (50 characters or less); 7
      • A Full Title of the anticipated proposal (which should not exceed 254 characters and is of a nature that is understandable by a scientifically trained person);
      • A brief description of the primary research area(s) and objective(s) of the anticipated work (the information in this item does not constrain in any way the proposal summary that must be submitted with the final proposal); and
      • The names of any Co-Is and/or Collaborators as known at the time the NOI is submitted. In order to enter these names those team members must have previously accessed and registered in NSPIRES themselves; a Principle Investigator (PI) cannot do this for them. 
  • Meeting with Shimei. Long! Discussed the NN code, RPGs and D&D, mapmaking
    • Send list of map quality markers from dissertation
    • Send some links about D&D and Play-by-post

Phil 1.8.18

7:00 – ASRC NASA

  • Software meeting at 9:00 in Beltsville
    • Products group
    • Attach an adder to the overhead?
    • 12.5% per bill on contract, so 10 contracts support one person
    • Currently covered for 3 months
    • AIMS 2019, TACLAMBDA have been approved (for the next 3 months?)
    • $300k from corporate across all groups.
    • Tasking for the next three months
    • Taking 2 modules out of A2P and making them compatible with AIMS.
    • Erik Velte runs TACLAMBDA
    • Evaluate the modules within A2P and migrate to TACLAMBDA (90% phil)
    • Some kind of machine learning for visa applications (RFP)?
    • Machine learning BAA?
    • We’re all ASTS, with TS signed by Eric/T
    • JPSS/NPP – changing from instrument data to telemetry
  • Sprint planning Meeting
  • Working on nn blog post

Phil 1.7.19

7:00 – 5:00 ASRC

  • Call Tim – The week looks dry
  • Schedule Physical – try tomorrow?
  • Continue with A guided tour through a dirt-simple “deep” neural network. Finished learning, started graphing
  • Downloaded the latest antibubbles and ran processing
  • More financial forecasting?
  • Sprint review?
    • Prepping by adding in all the things that I wound up doing
  • Worked on getting Aaron’s code working, which required installing MSVC 2017 which required me redistributing apps to clear up space on the SSD drive.

Phil 1.5.19

It seems to me that this might also be important for validating machine learning models. Getting a critical level for false classification might really help

  • The quest for an optimal alpha
    • Researchers who analyze data within the framework of null hypothesis significance testing must choose a critical “alpha” level, α, to use as a cutoff for deciding whether a given set of data demonstrates the presence of a particular effect. In most fields, α = 0.05 has traditionally been used as the standard cutoff. Many researchers have recently argued for a change to a more stringent evidence cutoff such as α = 0.01, 0.005, or 0.001, noting that this change would tend to reduce the rate of false positives, which are of growing concern in many research areas. Other researchers oppose this proposed change, however, because it would correspondingly tend to increase the rate of false negatives. We show how a simple statistical model can be used to explore the quantitative tradeoff between reducing false positives and increasing false negatives. In particular, the model shows how the optimal α level depends on numerous characteristics of the research area, and it reveals that although α = 0.05 would indeed be approximately the optimal value in some realistic situations, the optimal α could actually be substantially larger or smaller in other situations. The importance of the model lies in making it clear what characteristics of the research area have to be specified to make a principled argument for using one α level rather than another, and the model thereby provides a blueprint for researchers seeking to justify a particular α level.

Working more on A guided tour through a dirt-simple “deep” neural network

jaybookman

femexplore

Phil 12.28.18

7:00 – 4:30 ASRC NASA

  • Human mind excels at quantum-physics computer game 3o6ozkvdtdarNDhGEw
  • Continuing on the proposal:
    • [Optional] What are your success metrics for the AI system (i.e., how will you know whether the system has succeeded or failed)?
      • Discuss the spectrum of success, from classification of behavior type by syntax patterns (LSTM) to human-based manifold learning (t-sne, xxx2vec, etc) for map generation, to development of new spatial neural frameworks, potentially based on grid neurons.
    • [Optional] What else we should know?
      • I want to say something about how this is based on animal studies, and how the idea of intelligence being expensive computation has to affect any kind of collective system. Still thinking about that.
      • Also, the economic power of maps, as discussed here
    • How will you sustain and grow the impact of this work beyond this grant? How could your project and its impact grow beyond what you’ve proposed in this application?
    • Need to add a brief description of each paper and include the venue and a link

Phil 12.27.18

7:00 – 11:00 PhD

  • How Much of the Internet Is Fake? Turns Out, a Lot of It, Actually.
    • Fake people with fake cookies and fake social-media accounts, fake-moving their fake cursors, fake-clicking on fake websites — the fraudsters had essentially created a simulacrum of the internet, where the only real things were the ads.
  • More proposal. With respect to bot traffic, there is standalone, monolithic and complex behaviors that can also be tracked and used to assess the underlying information. Adversarial herding is an example.
  • Ran out of steam. Hung up on these questions:
    • [Optional] What are your success metrics for the AI system (i.e., how will you know whether the system has succeeded or failed)?
      • Discuss the spectrum of success, from classification of behavior type by syntax patterns (LSTM) to human-based manifold learning (t-sne, xxx2vec, etc) for map generation, to development of new spatial neural frameworks, potentially based on grid neurons.
    • [Optional] What else we should know?
      • I want to say something about how this is based on animal studies, and how the idea of intelligence being expensive computation has to affect any kind of collective system. Still thinking about that.
      • Also, the economic power of maps, as discussed here
    • How will you sustain and grow the impact of this work beyond this grant? How could your project and its impact grow beyond what you’ve proposed in this application?
    • Need to add a brief description of each paper and include the venue and a link

Phil 12.24.18

PhD 7:00 – 3:00

Phil 11.26.18

7:00 – 5:00ASRC PhD

  • Had a thought that simulation plus diversity might be an effective way of increasing system resilience. This is based on the discussion of Apollo 13 in Normal Accidents
  • Start folding in content from simulation papers. Don’t worry about coherence yet
  • Start figuring out PHPbb
    • Working on the IRB form – done
    • Set user creation to admin-approved – done
    • Create easily identifiable players
      • Asra Rogueplayer
      • Ping Clericplayer
      • Valen Fighterplayer
      • Emmi MonkPlayer
      • Avia Bardplayer
      • Mirek Thiefplayer
      • Lino Magicplayer
      • Daz Dmplayer
    • Some notes on play by post
    • Added Aaron as a founder. He’s set up the overall structure: dungeon
    • Add easily identifiable content. Working. Set up the AntibubblesDungeon as a python project. I’m going to write a script generator that we will then use to paste in content. Then back up and download the database and run queries on it locally.

Phil 11.13.18

7:00 – 4:30

  • Bills
  • Get oil change kit from Bob’s
  • Antonio paper – done first complete pass
  • Sent Wayne a note to see if he knows of any online D&D research. My results are thin (see below)
  • Nice chat with Aaron about mapping in the D&D space. We reiterated that the goal of the first paper should be able to do the following:
    • map a linear dungeon
    • map the belief space adjacent to the dungeon (PC debates to consensus on how to proceed)
    • map the space in an open dungeon
    • map the belief space adjacent to an open dungeon
    • Additionally, we should be able to show that diversity (or lack of it) is recognizable. A mixed party should have a broader lexical set than a party of only fighters
    • We also realized that mapping could be a very good lens for digital anthropology. An interesting follow on paper could be an examination of how users run through a known dungeon, such as The Tomb of Horrors to see how the map generates, and to compare that to a version where the names of the items have been disguised so it’s not obvious that it’s the same game
  • Ordered these books. There doesn’t seem to be much else in the space, so I’m curious about the reference section
    • Second Person: Role-Playing and Story in Games and Playable Media (MIT Press)
      • Games and other playable forms, from interactive fictions to improvisational theater, involve role playing and story—something played and something told. In Second Person, game designers, authors, artists, and scholars examine the different ways in which these two elements work together in tabletop role-playing games (RPGs), computer games, board games, card games, electronic literature, political simulations, locative media, massively multiplayer games, and other forms that invite and structure play.  Second Person—so called because in these games and playable media it is “you” who plays the roles, “you” for whom the story is being told—first considers tabletop games ranging from Dungeons & Dragons and other RPGs with an explicit social component to Kim Newman’s Choose Your Own Adventure-style novel Life’s Lottery and its more traditional author-reader interaction. Contributors then examine computer-based playable structures that are designed for solo interaction—for the singular “you”—including the mainstream hit Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time and the genre-defining independent production Façade. Finally, contributors look at the intersection of the social spaces of play and the real world, considering, among other topics, the virtual communities of such Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs) as World of Warcraft and the political uses of digital gaming and role-playing techniques (as in The Howard Dean for Iowa Game, the first U.S. presidential campaign game).
    • Third Person: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives (The MIT Press)
      • The ever-expanding capacities of computing offer new narrative possibilities for virtual worlds. Yet vast narratives—featuring an ongoing and intricately developed storyline, many characters, and multiple settings—did not originate with, and are not limited to, Massively Multiplayer Online Games. Thomas Mann’s Joseph and His Brothers, J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Marvel’s Spiderman, and the complex stories of such television shows as Dr. Who, The Sopranos, and Lost all present vast fictional worlds. Third Person explores strategies of vast narrative across a variety of media, including video games, television, literature, comic books, tabletop games, and digital art. The contributors—media and television scholars, novelists, comic creators, game designers, and others—investigate such issues as continuity, canonicity, interactivity, fan fiction, technological innovation, and cross-media phenomena. Chapters examine a range of topics, including storytelling in a multiplayer environment; narrative techniques for a 3,000,000-page novel; continuity (or the impossibility of it) in Doctor Who; managing multiple intertwined narratives in superhero comics; the spatial experience of the Final Fantasy role-playing games; World of Warcraft adventure texts created by designers and fans; and the serial storytelling of The Wire. Taken together, the multidisciplinary conversations in Third Person, along with Harrigan and Wardrip-Fruin’s earlier collections First Person and Second Person, offer essential insights into how fictions are constructed and maintained in very different forms of media at the beginning of the twenty-first century.
  • A Support System to Accumulate Interpretations of Multiple Story Timelines
    • The story base interpretation is subjectively summarised and segmented from the first-person viewpoint. However, we often need to objectively represent an entire image by integrated knowledge. Yet, this is a difficult task. We proposed a novel approach, named the synthetic evidential study (SES), for understanding and augmenting collective thought processes through substantiated thought by interactive media. In this study, we investigated the kind of data that can be obtained through the SES sessions as interpretation archives and whether the database is useful to understand multiple story timelines. For the purpose, we designed a machine-readable interpretation data format and developed support systems to create and provide data that are easy to understand. We conducted an experiment using the simulation of the projection phase in SES sessions. From the results, we suggested that a “meta comment” which was deepened interpretation comment by the others in the interpretation archives to have been posted when it was necessary to consider other participants’ interpretation to broaden their horizons before posting the comment. In addition, the construction of networks to represent the relationships between the interpretation comments enabled us to suggest the important comments by using the degree centrality.

Phil 11.12.18

7:00 – 7:00 ASRC PhD

  • Call Tim Ellis – done
  • Tags – done
  • Bills – nope, including MD EV paperwork -done
  • Get oil change kit from Bob’s – closed
  • Fika – done
  • Finish Similar neural responses predict friendship – Done!
  • Discrete hierarchical organization of social group sizes
    • The ‘social brain hypothesis’ for the evolution of large brains in primates has led to evidence for the coevolution of neocortical size and social group sizes, suggesting that there is a cognitive constraint on group size that depends, in some way, on the volume of neural material available for processing and synthesizing information on social relationships. More recently, work on both human and non-human primates has suggested that social groups are often hierarchically structured. We combine data on human grouping patterns in a comprehensive and systematic study. Using fractal analysis, we identify, with high statistical confidence, a discrete hierarchy of group sizes with a preferred scaling ratio close to three: rather than a single or a continuous spectrum of group sizes, humans spontaneously form groups of preferred sizes organized in a geometrical series approximating 3–5, 9–15, 30–45, etc. Such discrete scale invariance could be related to that identified in signatures of herding behaviour in financial markets and might reflect a hierarchical processing of social nearness by human brains.
  • Work on Antonio’s paper – good progress
  • Aaron added a lot of content to Belief Spaces, and we got together to discuss. Probably the best thing to come out of the discussion was an approach to the dungeons that at one end is an acyclic, directed, linear graph of connected nodes. The map will be a line, with any dilemma discussions connected with the particular nodes. At the other end is an open environment. In between are various open and closed graphs that we can classify with some level of complexity.
  • One of the things that might be interesting to examine is the distance between nodes, and how that affects behavior
  • Need to mention that D&D are among the oldest “digital residents” of the internet, with decades-old artifacts.