Phil 8.19.18

7:00 – 5:30 ASRC MKT

  • Had a thought that the incomprehension that comes from misalignment that Stephens shows resembles polarizing light. I need to add a slider that enables influence as a function of alignment. Done
    • Getting the direction cosine between the source and target belief
      double interAgentDotProduct = unitOrientVector.dotProduct(otherUnitOrientVector);
      double cosTheta = Math.min(1.0, interAgentDotProduct);
      double beliefAlignment = Math.toDegrees(Math.acos(cosTheta));
      double interAgentAlignment = (1.0 - beliefAlignment/180.0);
    • Adding a global variable that sets how much influence (0% – 100%) influence from an opposing agent. Just setting it to on/off, because the effects are actually pretty subtle
  • Add David’s contributions to slide one writeup – done
  • Start slide 2 writeup
  • Find casters for Dad’s walker
  • Submit forms for DME repair
    • Drat – I need the ECU number
  • Practice talk!
    • Need to reduce complexity and add clearly labeled sections, in particular methods
  • I need to start paying attention to attention
  • Also, keeping this on the list How social media took us from Tahrir Square to Donald Trump by Zeynep Tufekci
  • Social Identity Threat Motivates Science – Discrediting Online Comments
    • Experiencing social identity threat from scientific findings can lead people to cognitively devalue the respective findings. Three studies examined whether potentially threatening scientific findings motivate group members to take action against the respective findings by publicly discrediting them on the Web. Results show that strongly (vs. weakly) identified group members (i.e., people who identified as “gamers”) were particularly likely to discredit social identity threatening findings publicly (i.e., studies that found an effect of playing violent video games on aggression). A content analytical evaluation of online comments revealed that social identification specifically predicted critiques of the methodology employed in potentially threatening, but not in non-threatening research (Study 2). Furthermore, when participants were collectively (vs. self-) affirmed, identification did no longer predict discrediting posting behavior (Study 3). These findings contribute to the understanding of the formation of online collective action and add to the burgeoning literature on the question why certain scientific findings sometimes face a broad public opposition.

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